Inside Tulane Med: Quarterly News from the Tulane University School of Medicine

July 2017 Newsletter


Tulane team part of Lassa virus
breakthrough

Robert Garry and Dr. James Robinson
Robert Garry and
Dr. James Robinson
A team of scientists have for the first time mapped the molecular structure of an elusive surface protein on the Lassa virus that allows the pathogen to infect human cells. The research identifies a key antibody target that could serve as a blueprint for developing a vaccine or antibody-based drug against deadly Lassa fever. Tulane virologists and study co-authors Robert Garry and Dr. James Robinson have been researching Lassa fever with partners in West Africa for more than a decade. Tulane scientists collected blood samples from survivors in Sierra Leone and sent them back to New Orleans, where Robinson's lab worked to identify and clone more than 100 different antibodies used in the research. More >>


Trauma course added to
medical school curriculum

Third-year students practice bleeding-control techniques
Third-year students practice bleeding-control techniques
When a gunman attacked members of Congress at a baseball practice in June, a lawmaker who served in Iraq was able to deliver critical aid to victims before emergency responders arrived. The veteran had learned bleeding-control techniques designed to save lives of those critically wounded on the battlefield. Now all third-year students at Tulane University School of Medicine will get similar training thanks to a new program. "We want to make sure anybody who graduates knows how to stop bleeding whether they have seen it in real life or not," said Dr. Rebecca Schroll, assistant professor of trauma and critical care, who is leading the program. More >>


Tulane grad student lands
Silicon Valley biotech deal

Bioinnovation PhD student Nicholas Pashos
Bioinnovation PhD student Nicholas Pashos
A team from one of the nation's hottest biotech sectors tapped Tulane bioinnovation PhD student Nicholas Pashos to join an intensive, four-month program in San Francisco designed to fast-track high-potential startups. Biotech accelerator IndieBio will invest $250,000 in Pashos' company, BioAesthetics, to help him develop his innovation that aims to transform breast reconstruction surgery. Pashos invented an experimental graft that he hopes plastic surgeons can use to regenerate a nipple and areola for complete breast restoration after cancer treatment. More >>


Former pro athletes get
all-star treatment at new sports
medicine clinic

School of Medicine Dean Dr. L. Lee Hamm III, President Michael Fitts, Jabari Greer, Dr. Greg Stewart, Belinda Lerner, and Jyric Sims
At the PACT ribbon cutting, School of Medicine Dean Dr. L. Lee Hamm III, President Michael Fitts, Jabari Greer, Dr. Greg Stewart, Belinda Lerner and Jyric Sims
There are two Jabari Greers. There's the Saints Super Bowl champion. And there's the former athlete navigating his own healthcare. "The person that people think they know—the football player—isn't around anymore," Greer said. "But when you're in a public healthcare setting, it's very hard to keep up that 'warrior' persona and still be honest with your doctor about what you're going through." In May, a new 5,000-square-foot clinic opened that will provide exactly the type of atmosphere Greer describes. The Professional Athlete Care Team (PACT) was developed to support athletes' health and safety both on and off the field, said PACT medical director Dr. Greg Stewart, Tulane's chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation. More >>


Robotic thymectomy gives patient
something to cheer about

Alexis Resendez
Alexis Resendez
Brandi Resendez's 14-year-old daughter, Alexis, started complaining of a sore neck a year ago. Resendez first thought it might be all the work Alexis was putting in preparing for high school cheerleading tryouts, but the pain continued to get worse. A trip to the emergency room revealed a mass in Alexis' chest near her thyroid gland, and she was referred to Dr. Emad Kandil, chief of endocrine surgery at Tulane University School of Medicine. Kandil performed the first-ever robotic thymectomy in the world, using a single incision under the armpit. More >>


Quick cooling ThermoSuit
may prevent brain damage
in stroke patients

Dr. Justin Salerian, ThermoSuit co-inventor Robert Schock and Dr. Aimee Aysenne
Dr. Justin Salerian,
Robert Schock and
Dr. Aimee Aysenne
Tulane researchers are investigating therapeutic hypothermia—a method of cooling the body that often works for cardiac arrest patients—as a treatment for stroke. Dr. Justin Salerian, the new director of the Tulane Comprehensive Stroke Center, and his team are currently testing the Life Recovery Systems ThermoSuit in phase II trials. "We're the first center in the world testing this device on stroke patients," said Salerian, who is working with Dr. Aimee Aysenne, Tulane University School of Medicine assistant professor of neurological surgery, and ThermoSuit co-inventors Robert Schock and Dr. Robert Freedman in the trials. More >>


In This Issue

Tulane team part
of Lassa virus
breakthrough


Trauma course
added to medical
school curriculum


Tulane grad student
lands Silicon Valley
biotech deal


Former pro athletes
get all-star treatment
at new sports medicine
clinic


Robotic thymectomy
gives patient something
to cheer about


Quick cooling
ThermoSuit may
prevent brain damage
in stroke patients


Inside Tulane Med Newsletter


Alumni Donor
Spotlight:
Dr. John Smith

Dr. Jeffrey Kutcher

When Dr. John Smith and his wife, Linda, were searching for ways to benefit the public good, giving back seemed like the perfect choice. "There is no better lasting benefit for the world than education," said Smith, a 1960 graduate. "Tulane gave me a great preparation for my career, and supporting a scholarship just seemed like the right thing to do." More >


Reunions

If your class year ends in a 3 or an 8, plan your trip to celebrate with your classmates in April 2018!


Class Notes

See what your fellow School of Medicine
alums are doing >>


Update your
Class Notes >>


Nominate a fellow grad
for an Alumni Award >>


Upcoming Events

Pre-Reunion
Bowling Bash

Sept. 16, 2017
Rock ‘N’ Bowl
Classes of '58, '63, '68, '73, '78, '83, '88, '93, '98, '03, '08, '13

TAA Awards Gala
March 24, 2018

Spring Reunion
Weekend

April 20-21, 2018
Classes of '58, '63, '73, '78, '83, '88, '93, '98, '03, '08, '13

1834 Society and
TMAA Awards
Reception

April 20, 2018
(during reunions)

Class of 1968
50th Reunion

May 17-19, 2018

Contact Cynthia at chayes@tulane.edu
for information about
all upcoming events.


CME activities at the
Center for Continuing
Education


CME activities at the
Goldring Center for
Culinary Medicine







Update your donor
contact information >>
Tulane University School of Medicine
Contact Us:
insidetulanemed@tulane.edu
504-988-5462
Mailing Address:
1430 Tulane Ave., #8001
New Orleans, LA 70112
Tulane School of Medicine